The Aspirin Alternative Your Doctor Never Told You About

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The Aspirin Alternative Your Doctor Never Told You About

Millions of people are using aspirin daily without realizing its true dangers. There is good news however, there is a natural alternative which preliminary research indicates is safer and more effective.

WARNING: Never discontinue a pharmaceutical product without the guidance of a physician. Doing so could have serious, if not life threatening side effects. This article is for informational purposes only. Nothing here is intended as or should be substituted for medical advice.

Millions of people use aspirin daily as a preventive measure against heart attack, often without the user having any awareness of the serious health risks associated with it, some potentially fatal. If you have any doubts about how serious a concern this is, you can view over 60 adverse effects of aspirin on the GreenMedInfo.com’s aspirin research page.

Aspirin’s widespread popularity is based on its much-touted blood-thinning properties. On the other hand, there are safer and surprisingly more effective as well as far more natural alternatives available on the market today.

For example, pycnogenol is a branded form of an extract of French maritime pine bark. It can be found on the shelves of thousands of health food stores around the country. It’s unique among natural products and has a broad base of human clinical research supporting its use for a wide variety of health conditions. You can view GreenMedInfo.com’s pycnogenol research page take a look at the published research.

Furthermore, pycnogenol has been found at least as effective as aspirin in preventing blood from clotting, but at significantly lower doses and with a superior safety profile in many cross comparison tests.

Smoker’s Study Proves Pycnogenol More Effective and Safer Than Aspirin

A 1999 clinical study published in Thrombotic Research, found that when habitual smokers were given either 500 mg of aspirin or anywhere between 100-200 mg of pycnogenol, the pycnogenol group experienced equivalent platelet aggregation inhibiting effects but with much lower bleeding times:

“Thus, smoking-induced enhanced platelet aggregation was inhibited by 500 mg Aspirin as well as by a lower range of 100-125 mg Pycnogenol. Aspirin significantly (p<0.001) increased bleeding time from 167 to 236 seconds while Pycnogenol did not.These observations suggest an advantageous risk-benefit ratio for Pycnogenol.”

This was a highly significant finding. Aspirin-induced bleeding can result in significantly increased morbidity and mortality. You might ask yourself, if pycnogenol is as effective as aspirin without the side effects, then what’s the downside of using it?

New Study Confirms Pycnogenol’s Superiority to Aspirin

Researches comparing aspirin to pycnogenol as a blood thinner have been sparse. However, a new study promises to add additional weight to the previously reported finding of pycnogenol’s superiority. A study published in the Italian journal Panminerva Medica titled, “Recurrence of retinal vein thrombosis with Pycnogenol® or Aspirin® supplementation: a registry study,” compared uses of either pycnogenol or aspirin in prevention of retinal vein thrombosis recurrence after a first episode.

Retinal vein thrombosis – considered to be a relatively common condition closely related to other conditions afflicting the vascular system, like hypertension, arteriosclerosis and diabetes.

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